1972–73 Australian region cyclone season

1972–73 Australian region cyclone season
1972-1973 Australian cyclone season summary.jpg
Season summary map
Seasonal boundaries
First system formed7 December 1972
Last system dissipated6 May 1973
Strongest storm
NameFlores
 • Maximum winds165 km/h (105 mph)
(10-minute sustained)
 • Lowest pressure950 hPa (mbar)
Seasonal statistics
Tropical lows15
Tropical cyclones15
Severe tropical cyclones9
Total fatalities1,650+
(Deadliest Australian region cyclone season recorded)
Total damageUnknown
Related articles
Australian region tropical cyclone seasons
1970–71, 1971–72, 1972–73, 1973–74, 1974–75

The 1972–73 Australian region cyclone season was an above-average tropical cyclone season, in terms of activity. Additionally, it is also the deadliest tropical cyclone season recorded in the Australian region, with Cyclone Flores killing an estimated 1,650 people alone, making Flores the single-deadliest tropical cyclone recorded in the entire Southern Hemisphere.[1]

Systems

Tropical Cyclone Ivy-Beatrice

Category 1 tropical cyclone (Australian scale)
Tropical storm (SSHWS)
Temporary cyclone south.svg Ivy-Beatrice 1972 track.png
DurationDecember 7 – December 9 (Crossed 80°E)
Peak intensity65 km/h (40 mph) (10-min)  994 hPa (mbar)

Tropical Cyclone Ivy developed over the eastern Indian Ocean on December 7. The cyclone entered the southwest Indian Ocean basin after crossing 80°E and was renamed Beatrice.

Severe Tropical Cyclone Jean

Category 3 severe tropical cyclone (Australian scale)
Category 1 tropical cyclone (SSHWS)
Jean 1973-01-12.png Jean 1973 track.png
DurationJanuary 10 – January 17
Peak intensity150 km/h (90 mph) (10-min)  964 hPa (mbar)

On January 10, Jean developed northwest of Western Australia. It strengthened into a Category 4 severe tropical cyclone, before being last noted on January 17.

Severe Tropical Cyclone Kerry

Category 4 severe tropical cyclone (Australian scale)
Category 2 tropical cyclone (SSHWS)
KerryJanuary211973.gif Kerry 1973 track.png
DurationJanuary 19 – January 24
Peak intensity165 km/h (105 mph) (10-min)  960 hPa (mbar)

At Wickham on 21 January 1973 more than 30 houses were partly unroofed and some houses received major damage. There was no damage to buildings in Dampier, Roebourne or Karratha as the cyclone crossed the coast well to the east. Kerry passed close to a number of oil-drilling rigs causing damage and lost productivity time that cost over one million dollars. Maximum recorded gust was 140 km/h at Cape Lambert.[2]

Tropical Cyclone Leila-Gertrude

Category 2 tropical cyclone (Australian scale)
Tropical storm (SSHWS)
MaudeJanuary301973.gif Leila-Gertrude 1973 track.png
DurationJanuary 21 – January 23 (Crossed 80°E)
Peak intensity100 km/h (60 mph) (10-min)  980 hPa (mbar)

Tropical Cyclone Leila formed offshore Western Australia on January 21. Moving generally westward, the storm crossed 80°E on January 23 and was renamed Gertrude.

Severe Tropical Cyclone Adeline

Category 3 severe tropical cyclone (Australian scale)
Category 1 tropical cyclone (SSHWS)
AdelineJanuary301973.png Adeline 1973 track.png
DurationJanuary 27 – January 29
Peak intensity130 km/h (80 mph) (10-min)  970 hPa (mbar)

Tropical Cyclone Adeline developed in the Gulf of Carpentaria on January 27. Moving south-southwestward, Adeline made landfall near the Northern Territory-Queensland border, shortly before dissipating on January 29.

Tropical Cyclone Maud

Category 1 tropical cyclone (Australian scale)
Tropical storm (SSHWS)
MaudeJanuary301973.gif Maud 1973 track.png
DurationJanuary 28 – January 31
Peak intensity85 km/h (50 mph) (10-min)  990 hPa (mbar)

Tropical Cyclone Maud existed offshore Western Australia from January 28 to January 31.

Tropical Cyclone Kristy

Category 3 severe tropical cyclone (Australian scale)
Category 1 tropical cyclone (SSHWS)
Kristy 1973-02-26.png Kirsty 1973 track.png
DurationFebruary 24 – March 1
Peak intensity120 km/h (75 mph) (10-min)  975 hPa (mbar)

Tropical Cyclone Kristy developed southwest of the Solomon Islands on February 24. Heading generally southward, Kristy dissipated well east of New South Wales on March 1.

Severe Tropical Cyclone Leah

Category 3 severe tropical cyclone (Australian scale)
Category 1 tropical cyclone (SSHWS)
Leah 1973-03-04.png Leah 1973 track.png
DurationFebruary 27 – March 11
Peak intensity120 km/h (75 mph) (10-min)  973 hPa (mbar)

The next system, Cyclone Leah, formed near the coast of Western Australia on February 27. Moving southwestward, Leah eventually dissipated on March 11.

Severe Tropical Cyclone Madge

Category 4 severe tropical cyclone (Australian scale)
Category 2 tropical cyclone (SSHWS)
MadgeMarch1319730105UTC.gif Madge 1973 track.png
DurationFebruary 28 – March 18
Peak intensity165 km/h (105 mph) (10-min)  952 hPa (mbar)

Cyclone Madge originated in the vicinity of the Solomon Islands on February 28. Tracking west-southwestward, Madge struck the Cape York Peninsula early on March 4. By late the following day, the cyclone made landfall near Numbulwar, Northern Territory. Moving across Northern Territory and Queensland, Madge emerged into the Indian Ocean on March 10. The storm headed generally westward for the next several days, until dissipating on March 18.

Severe Tropical Cyclone Nellie

Category 3 severe tropical cyclone (Australian scale)
Category 1 tropical cyclone (SSHWS)
NellieMarch1619730155UTC.gif Nellie 1973 track.png
DurationMarch 13 – March 23
Peak intensity150 km/h (90 mph) (10-min)  964 hPa (mbar)

On March 13, Cyclone Nellie formed offshore Queensland. It moved generally west-southwestward before dissipated on March 23.

Tropical Cyclone Bella

Category 1 tropical cyclone (Australian scale)
Tropical storm (SSHWS)
Bella 1973-03-23.png Bella 1973 track.png
DurationMarch 20 – March 25
Peak intensity65 km/h (40 mph) (10-min)  998 hPa (mbar)

Cyclone Bella developed over the Arafura Sea on March 20. It struck North Territory before dissipating on March 25.

Tropical Cyclone Paula

Category 1 tropical cyclone (Australian scale)
Tropical storm (SSHWS)
Paula 1973-03-29.png Paula 1973 track.png
DurationMarch 26 – April 1
Peak intensity65 km/h (40 mph) (10-min)  997 hPa (mbar)

The next system, Cyclone Paula, formed southwest of Indonesia on March 26. Paula moved southwestward and dissipated about six days later.

Tropical Cyclone Roma

Category 2 tropical cyclone (Australian scale)
Tropical storm (SSHWS)
Roma 1973-04-19.png Roma 1973 track.png
DurationApril 18 – April 23
Peak intensity110 km/h (70 mph) (10-min)  982 hPa (mbar)

Cyclone Roma existed from April 18 to April 23.

Cyclone Flores

Category 3 severe tropical cyclone (Australian scale)
Category 3 tropical cyclone (SSHWS)
Flores 1973-04-28.png Flores 1973 track.png
DurationApril 26 – April 29
Peak intensity150 km/h (95 mph) (10-min)  950 hPa (mbar)

The strongest tropical cyclone of the season developed in the Banda Sea on April 26. The storm peaked with a barometric pressure of 950 mbar (28 inHg). The storm struck the island of Flores before dissipating on April 29. Widespread destruction of houses, schools, and bridges was reported in four of the island's districts. 53 on Flores were killed, and 21 perished in the sinking of a Timorese fishing ship, the Oarbiru.[3] Additionally, over 1,500 fisherman were reported lost at sea. The area's remoteness kept information about the cyclone's effects from reaching the news for over a month.[4] The storm killed a total of 1,650 people, making it the deadliest tropical cyclone recorded in the Southern Hemisphere.[1][5]

Severe Tropical Cyclone Marcelle

Category 3 severe tropical cyclone (Australian scale)
Category 1 tropical cyclone (SSHWS)
Marcelle 1973-05-03.png Marcelle 1973 track.png
DurationApril 29 – May 9
Peak intensity120 km/h (75 mph) (10-min)  975 hPa (mbar)

Marcelle, the final tropical cyclone of the season, developed well west of Indonesia on April 29. The storm struck near Busselton, Western Australia late on May 7. Marcelle dissipated well south of Australia about two days later.

See also

  • 1892 Mauritius cyclone – The third-deadliest cyclone recorded in the Southern Hemisphere
  • Cyclone Mahina – The most powerful tropical cyclone recorded in the Southern Hemisphere; also the deadliest tropical cyclone in Australian history
  • Cyclone Idai – The second-deadliest cyclone recorded in the Southern Hemisphere; devastated the nations east of the Mozambique Channel in 2019
  • Cyclone Leon–Eline – A very long-lived and deadly tropical cyclone that devastated Mozambique in 2000
  • 1970 Bhola cyclone – The deadliest tropical cyclone recorded worldwide
  • Atlantic hurricane seasons: 1972, 1973
  • Eastern Pacific hurricane seasons: 1972, 1973
  • Western Pacific typhoon seasons: 1972, 1973
  • North Indian Ocean cyclone seasons: 1972, 1973

References

  1. ^ a b Masters, Jeff. "Africa's Hurricane Katrina: Tropical Cyclone Idai Causes an Extreme Catastrophe". Weather Underground. Retrieved 23 March 2019. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  2. ^ BoM - Tropical Cyclones affecting Karratha/Dampier
  3. ^ http://www.bom.gov.au/cyclone/nt/Unnamed_Flores_Sea.shtml
  4. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2013-01-17. Retrieved 2018-04-29.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  5. ^ Jeff Masters (1 April 2019). "Death Toll From Idai Rises Above 800: 3rd Deadliest Southern Hemisphere Cyclone on Record". Weather Underground. Retrieved 22 June 2019. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)

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